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Best Loudspeakers: $20,000 – $50,000

Sanders Model 10e

Sanders Model 10e

$20,000 (includes one Sanders Magtech amplifier)

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Graham Audio LS5/5

Graham LS5/5

$21,190

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Legacy Aeris with Wavelet DSP

Legacy Aeris with Wavelet DSP

$21,477 ($27,792 with Wavelet II upgrade)

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Muraudio SP1

Muraudio SP1

$22,400

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Harbeth M40.3 XD

Harbeth M40.3 XD

$22,500–$24,500

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Raidho TD1.2

Raidho TD1.2

$24,000, piano black; $27,000, walnut

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Revel Salon2

Revel Salon2

$24,200

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MBL 120

MBL 120

$26,500 (stands, $2080)

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YG Acoustics Carmel 2

YG Acoustics Carmel 2

$26,500

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Magico A5

Magico A5

$26,800

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German Physiks HRS-130

German Physiks HRS-130

$27,000–$32,000 (depending on finish)

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Kharma Elegance S7 Signature

Kharma Elegance S7 Signature

$28,000

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PS Audio FR30

PS Audio FR30

$28,499

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Estelon YB Mk II

Estelon YB Mk II

$29,000

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TAD Evolution One TX

TAD Evolution One TX

$29,995

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Stenheim Alumine Three

Stenheim Alumine Three

$33,950

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Acora SRC-1

Acora SRC-1

$35,000

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Sound Lab Majestic 745

Sound Lab Majestic 745

$35,670

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Paradigm Persona 9H

Paradigm Persona 9H

$36,999

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Audiovector R6 Arreté

Audiovector R6 Arreté

$37,000

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Bowers & Wilkins 801 D4 Signature

Bowers & Wilkins 801 D4

$38,000

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Rockport Technologies Atria II

Rockport Technologies Atria II

$38,000

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Magnepan MG30.7

Magnepan MG30.7

$39,995

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Vandersteen Audio Kento Carbon

Vandersteen Audio Kento Carbon

$41,700

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German Physiks Borderland MK IV Loudspeaker

German Physiks Borderland Mk IV

$42,000-49,000 (depending on finish)

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Joseph Audio Pearl 20/20 Graphene

Joseph Audio Pearl 20/20 Graphene

$43,999

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Raidho TD2.2

Raidho TD2.2

$46,500

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Estelon XB Mk II

Estelon XB Mk II

$48,000

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Voxativ 9.87

Voxativ 9.87

$49,990

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Sanders Model 10e

Sanders Model 10e

$20,000 (includes one Sanders Magtech amplifier)

The 10e is a hybrid with a flat electrostatic panel mounted above a transmission-line-loaded woofer. The speaker, which must be bi-amped, comes with a DSP crossover with a variety of user adjustments. The lack of midrange coloration puts the Sanders in the top echelon. This is one of the lowest-coloration speakers available. And when you consider that even if you buy two Sanders Magtech amplifiers—one comes along as part of the $20,000 package—the total cost, exclusive of source components, is $25,000 and that you can adjust the speaker to suit your room and your tastes, the Model 10e is not only a wonder but also a bargain. REG, 276

Read the full review: Sanders Model 10e Hybrid Electrostatic Loudspeaker
Graham LS5/5

Graham LS5/5

$21,190

Based on a loudspeaker originally designed by the British Broadcasting Corporation in the mid-Sixties, the 5/5 is a three-way that, by slot-loading the midrange and woofer for wider, smoother, more even axial response, manages the difficult trick of a uniform frequency response across an approximately 60-degree window, while at the same time realizing state-of-the-art imaging and a commandingly impressive dynamic range. Bass response is deep enough to obviate the need for a subwoofer, while the overall tonal balance is such that day after day on recording after recording over several months the 5/5 left reviewer Paul Seydor feeling he was hearing back to original sources in a way he’s experienced with very few speakers. PS judges it the finest three-way, cone-based loudspeaker in his experience and one of the finest, period. PS, 331

Read the full review: Graham Audio LS5/5
Legacy Aeris with Wavelet DSP

Legacy Aeris with Wavelet DSP

$21,477 ($27,792 with Wavelet II upgrade)

The combination of the frequency-and time-domain-optimized four-and-a-half-way Aeris loudspeaker and its companion Wavelet DSP processor/crossover provides some of the most musically realistic sound reviewer AHC has ever encountered. This duo takes digital processing and room correction a vital step forward and show that a DSP’d speaker can reach levels that are even competitive with the best purist speakers, and some that sell for far higher prices. AHC, 269

Read the full review: Legacy Aeris with Wavelet Processor
Muraudio SP1

Muraudio SP1

$22,400

This elegant if unusual speaker combines two sealed-box cone woofers above and below Muraudio’s unique, doubly curved electrostatic drivers. The curvature of the driver element both horizontally and vertically generates an effect resembling a virtual point source rather than sounding like a typical flat panel. The SP1 is very clean with extremely low distortion. The bass is very well integrated and precise in character, albeit not extended to the lowest lows. The spatial impression is attractively unconstrained, and the balance is overall neutral. Muraudio became famous a few years ago for its omni PX1 model, which used three doubly curved panels to form a 360-degree source. But the SP1, at a much lower and very reasonable price for what is involved, is a truly exceptional speaker in its own right. REG, 293

Read the full review: Muraudio SP1 Hybrid Electrostatic Loudspeaker
Harbeth M40.3 XD

Harbeth M40.3 XD

$22,500–$24,500

A large three-way that requires stand-mounting, the M40.3 is the virtual embodiment of tonal neutrality, and with a frequency response from 38Hz–20kHz of ±3dB, (but near ruler-flat across most of that range) it possesses an ease, effortlessness, and lack of strain that translate into a listening experience that draws all the attention to the music. Like the M40.2, the M40.3 represents the designer Alan Shaw’s highest development so far of the BBC school of speaker design, possessing a sheer musical authority almost nonexistent in PS’ previous experience. The M40.3 is now PS’ reference when it comes to reproducing music in all its natural power and glory. PS, 269/293

Raidho TD1.2

Raidho TD1.2

$24,000, piano black; $27,000, walnut

This wonderful mini-monitor plays music with a lot more dynamic impact, control, and sonic heft than it should be able to muster given its size. Its robust sound could easily be mistaken for that of a small-to-medium floorstander. It recreates a large, airy soundscape filled with well-defined images in a coherent contextual whole. High resolution without sounding forced is the TD1.2’s main strength. One has a feeling of peering into the recording event, so well does it portray fine details. It also allows all kinds of music to retain their verve and beauty, and thereby makes listening a real pleasure. It is limited in low-frequency extension and dynamic range, as all mini-monitors are, and it is expensive. The TD1.2 is for the enthusiast of fine mini-monitors, who appreciates the strengths—and accepts the weaknesses—of the genre and is willing to acquire one of the best available. Kirk Midtskog, 304

Read the full review: Raidho TD1.2 Loudspeaker
Revel Salon2

Revel Salon2

$24,200

The result of five years of intensive research into every aspect of speaker performance, the Salon2 represents a genuine breakthrough in dynamic loudspeakers. Although it’s impressive in all performance parameters, its treble is extremely natural and well-integrated. Extremely natural rendering of timbre and dynamics. Although it’s been on the market for a long time without updates, it’s still a compelling contender that competes with more expensive speakers. Bring a high-powered amplifier. RH, 178

Read the full review: Revel Ultima Salon2 Loudspeaker
MBL 120

MBL 120

$26,500 (stands, $2080)

The omnidirectional MBL 120 has been specially engineered for medium-sized rooms—and in such environs it sounds fabulous. The soundstage it throws has never been more holographic or enveloping. More extended across the frequency spectrum and far less colored in the bass than the 121, it is a more refined speaker in every category. The best small MBL yet. NG, 228

Read the full review: MBL 120 Loudspeaker and Corona Line Electronics
YG Acoustics Carmel 2

YG Acoustics Carmel 2

$26,500

Much of YG’s technology from its higher-end offerings found a place in this two-way, floorstander, along with standard YG features like a solid-aluminum sealed enclosure, proprietary anti-resonance devices, and world-class fit and finish. The result is a slender package with a surprisingly big, lively sound and an ability to delve deeper than you’d expect. The highs are more extended (an airy 40kHz) than a typical soft-dome tweeter, with the benefit of no metallic glare. Imaging, tonality, detail, and dynamics are all at a bespoke level. Musically, the speaker is an unending delight. The YG also fits perfectly into today’s smaller, shared-purpose listening spaces. The speaker is stylish enough to complement any décor, is perfectly happy tucked out of the way near the wall behind it, doesn’t require humongous amps, and sounds great even at low volume. AT, 320

Read the full review: YG Acoustics Carmel 2 floorstanding loudspeaker
Magico A5

Magico A5

$26,800

Magico’s A5 brings the company’s vaunted technologies to a less lofty price point. The A5 is a three-way, five-driver system in a sealed, anodized-aluminum enclosure that features materials and construction techniques previously implemented in Magico’s top Q series. The result is a speaker that offers crisp, tight extension down to 24Hz, staggering dynamics for its size, and a lifelike sense of weight and body. The overall presentation is triumphantly cohesive; image accuracy and presence are meticulous. The A5 offers micro-resolution, yet never sounds analytical. A terrific speaker and a great value. MC, 320

Read the full review: The Magico A5 Loudspeaker Review
German Physiks HRS-130

German Physiks HRS-130

$27,000–$32,000 (depending on finish)

The Unlimited II’s bigger brother combines a carbon-fiber Dicks Dipole Driver (DDD) with a floor-firing 10″ woofer. The DDD is a serious attempt to mimic the coherent soundfield produced by a small radially pulsating cylinder. Expect an exceptionally wide sweet spot coupled with palpable image outlines. The HRS-130 is almost perfect for a small-to-medium-sized room, providing that the room is acoustically tuned along the lines of live-end/dead-end to sharpen image focus. Midrange textures are capable of exceptional purity, characterized by low levels of distortion through the upper midrange. DO, 276

Read the full review: German Physiks HRS-130 Loudspeaker
Kharma Elegance S7 Signature

Kharma Elegance S7 Signature

$28,000

A loudspeaker for connoisseurs who appreciate the finest the high end can offer. The look is sumptuous, the quality of materials stunning, and the mirror-like finish breathtaking. But it’s the sound that truly seduces—ripe with detail and harmonic complexity. Credit is due to the beryllium tweeter, which makes a great match with Kharma’s proprietary composite (KCD) woofers (goodbye to Accuton ceramic drivers). Ideal for smaller to medium-sized rooms, yet so potent in output and midbass thrust it’s easy to forget it’s a mere two-way. Like all Kharma speakers it has a delicacy, low-level resolving power, and micro-dynamic dexterity that touch both the mind and the heart. NG, 253

Read the full review: Kharma Elegance S7-S Signature
PS Audio FR30

PS Audio FR30

$28,499

After nearly 50 years in the electronics business, PS Audio has released a speaker—and it’s a great one. The drivers are all custom-made for the FR30 and include two innovative planar-magnetic transducers—a 10″ midrange and two 2.5″ tweeters. Four 8″ woofers augmented by four 10″ side-firing passive radiators add bottom-end firepower. The oval enclosure sits on a platform that raises it from the floor, giving the FR30 a distinctive appearance. This formidable driver array produced some of the smoothest, best integrated, and musically realistic bass AHC has heard. But the midrange and treble reproduction from those large planar-magnetic drivers were the stars of the show. There was more detail at every level of sound, particularly on low-level passages that faded away into silence. There was no hardening of the midrange and treble at any listening level. AHC called the PS Audio FR30 “one of the finest reference speakers now available, and certainly one that does help define the current state of the art.” AHC, 331

Read the full review: PS Audio FR30 Loudspeaker
Estelon YB Mk II

Estelon YB Mk II

$29,000

Estelon’s least-expensive full-range loudspeaker manifests all the virtues of the Estonian manufacturer’s most ambitious products, including a uniquely shaped enclosure fabricated from a proprietary marble composite material. In this non-resonant cabinet, the YB Mk II’s three drivers—a ScanSpeak 1″ beryllium dome, a ScanSpeak 5.8″ sliced-paper cone mid/woofer, and a SEAS 8.6″ aluminum woofer, all basically off-the-shelf parts—function optimally. The Estelons spatiality may be their strongest selling point. The speakers also excel at the reproduction of the human voice. Unquestionably, the YB Mk IIs function best with substantial high-current amplifiers, which provide all the low-end heft and “grip” they’re capable of. The speaker’s appearance is stunning, winning the YB model a prestigious Red Dot international design award in 2017. AQ, 320

TAD Evolution One TX

TAD Evolution One TX

$29,995

Standing roughly four feet tall on its spiked outrigger base, this 3-way bass-reflex design features a 1″ beryllium dome tweeter that is mounted coaxially within a 3.5″ midrange cone, making for a better off-axis listening experience. Two 6.3″ woofers with membranes fabricated from a laminated material of aramid fabric and raw fibers complete the driver complement. All the transducers are made from scratch by TAD. Slit-shaped ports on both lateral surfaces of the Evolution One TX contribute to the flexibility in room placement that characterizes the speaker—it will perform well just a foot-and-a-half from the room boundary behind it. Scaling of musical forces, layered depth, and timbral accuracy are all excellent. AQ, 328

Read the full review: TAD Evolution One TX Loudspeaker
Stenheim Alumine Three

Stenheim Alumine Three

$33,950

The new 3½-way “compact reference” loudspeaker from the relatively young Swiss company Stenheim is an explosive musical launchpad that brings a set of strengths to the market that is frankly unique in one small (but 150-pound-heavy) package. An unusually high 93dB sensitivity with a nominal 8-ohm impedance (6 ohms minimum) opens the window of usable amplification. Imagine the presence and energy of your favorite horn loudspeaker (but without the unpleasant colorations) squeezed into a small, attractive aluminum enclosure that can fit in your small to medium-sized listening room. AM, 304

Read the full review: Stenheim Alumine Three Loudspeaker
Acora SRC-1

Acora SRC-1

$35,000

The Acora SRC-1 is a new product from a new company. This is a high-end loudspeaker with a stone enclosure that succeeds in all important audiophile metrics. CNC technology allows for the eight pieces of granite that comprise each cabinet to be cut to the exacting tolerances required so that they fit together perfectly and function as they should acoustically. A ported, surprisingly svelte, 246-pound two-way floorstander, the SRC-1 uses a 1″ soft dome tweeter and a 7″ sandwich paper-cone woofer, sourced from ScanSpeak and rebuilt by Acora in Toronto. The presentation of musically meaningful detail is the SRC-1’s major strength, as is its rendering of image size and recording space. Bass is tuneful, with good impact. Orchestral climaxes are majestic, most certainly because nothing is vibrating that shouldn’t be. An instant classic. AQ, 308

Read the full review: Acora Acoustics SRC-1 Loudspeaker
Sound Lab Majestic 745

Sound Lab Majestic 745

$35,670

Like a MartinLogan CLX with a real low end, this huge and hugely wonderful electrostat has the biggest soundfield, far and away the deepest bass (true 20Hz extension), and most lifelike dynamic range of any ‘stat—in addition to the traditional virtues of ‘stats (gorgeous tone color, lightning transient response, single-driver coherence, and phenomenal inner detail). It can sound a bit warm and dark in balance and overblown in the bottom octaves if placement and amplification aren’t carefully minded. JV, 122

Paradigm Persona 9H

Paradigm Persona 9H

$36,999

Along with the Legacy speakers, the Persona 9H is a product from one of only two manufacturers AHC has found that can really do room correction well. The Persona line features the excellent Anthem Room Correction (ARC) to remove room-induced peaks and dips. The 9H is truly flat (±2dB 19Hz–45kHz), has very deep, quick, and detailed bass, and a superb new beryllium midrange driver and beryllium tweeter with a great deal of life and detail but no hardness. Each woofer is driven by a DSP-controlled 700W amplifier. With excellent driver integration and something much closer to a point-source sound than most complex speaker systems, the 9H provides some of the best imaging and soundstage performance at any price, and its size and weight are far more practical than that of many contenders for the state of the art. AHC, 272

Read the full review: Paradigm Persona 9H Loudspeaker
Audiovector R6 Arreté

Audiovector R6 Arreté

$37,000

The Audiovector R6 Arreté uses the advanced technology created for the R8 and Flagship R11 Arreté in a “more affordable” package designed for smaller rooms. A six-driver floorstander, the R6 includes an AMT tweeter, rear firing 3″ midrange, two 6.5″ front-firing carbon-fiber midrange drivers, and an isobaric-loaded woofer, implementing a 6.5″ and 8″ woofer. The sonic character of the R6 Arreté can be generally described as unconstrained and accurate, with an emphasis on resolution and natural detail. It’s not that there is more there; it’s just that the definition of what’s there is cleaner, crisper, and more resolved. Add to that an almost magically neutral midrange of miraculous speed and you begin to get the idea. Low frequencies are fast paced and articulate to match the speed and accuracy up top. If you favor detail, dimensionality, clarity, and scale, then these speakers need to be on your list. MC, 313

Read the full review: Audiovector R6 Arreté Loudspeaker
Bowers & Wilkins 801 D4

Bowers & Wilkins 801 D4

$38,000

The fourth generation of this iconic loudspeaker continues the development of a product that was advanced for its time when introduced 43 years ago. In addition to the “reverse wrap” enclosure design first seen with the D3 iteration, the current 801 has a reconsidered internal Matrix construction to further control unwanted resonances. Also new is B&W’s Biomimetic Suspension System that improves the mechanical behavior of the midrange driver’s spider, and the woofers now sport anti-resonance plugs to reduce flexing. These changes, and other refinements, result in a loudspeaker that’s fearless when it comes to dynamics and low-frequency reproduction, but also delivers all the spatial and tonal subtleties of the best recordings. AQ, 325

Read the full review: Bowers & Wilkins 801 D4 Loudspeaker
Rockport Technologies Atria II

Rockport Technologies Atria II

$38,000

The Atria embodies the best in modern speaker design. Its vanishingly low distortion leads to uncanny levels of purity and resolution, while also making the speaker easy to listen to. The Atria is also highly coherent, speaking with one voice—a voice that disappears as a source and can throw a soundstage so deep it’s spooky. Surprisingly in this size and price range, this speaker has plenty of bass heft and dynamic range to spare. All these elements come together effortlessly, creating an experience that will hold you in its spell. A terrific speaker and a great value, too. AT, 241

Magnepan MG30.7

Magnepan MG30.7

$39,995

This giant, four-panel (two panels per side), four-way, ribbon/quasi-ribbon line source loudspeaker from Magnepan is the best Maggie JV has heard. With its highly coherent wavelaunch, free-standing imaging, vast soundstage, phenomenal resolution of inner detail, lightning transient response, incomparable naturalness of timbre, and total lack of box coloration and diffraction, the 30.7 is markedly less “there” as a sound source (and markedly more lifelike on voice and acoustic instruments) than almost every dynamic-speaker-in-a-box, no matter its price. The best buy in an ultra-high-end loudspeaker (and one of the best high-end buys of all time), the 30.7 earned JV’s most ecstatic recommendation and TAS’ 2017 Overall Product of the Year award. JV, 279

Read the full review: Magnepan MG30.7
Vandersteen Audio Kento Carbon

Vandersteen Audio Kento Carbon

$41,700

After a long and hugely successful run, Vandersteen’s Model 5 has been replaced with the significantly improved Kento Carbon. This four-way, five-driver system features two side-firing 9″ woofers powered by an integral amplifier, a 6.5″ tri-woven mid/woofer, Vandersteen’s 4.5″ Perfect Piston midrange, and the company’s unique 1″ carbon tweeter. An 11-band analog-equalization system allows you to flatten the in-room response below 200Hz. The first-order crossovers and slanted baffle assure that the Kento is phase-coherent at the listening position. Sonically, the Kento is remarkably coherent from top-to-bottom, speaking with one voice. Bass is excellent, with outstanding clarity, aided by the ability to fine-tune the bottom end to your room. More than a worthy successor to the venerable Model 5. Andre Jennings, 312

Read the full review: Vandersteen Audio Kento Carbon Loudspeaker
German Physiks Borderland Mk IV

German Physiks Borderland Mk IV

$42,000-49,000 (depending on finish)

Finding an omni-directional speaker that works in real-world rooms can be a challenge. Finding one that is simple to set up, somewhat affordable, relatively easy to drive and sounds like music is near impossible. Yet German Physiks’ Borderland Mk IV, with its Dicks Dipole Driver (DDD) omnidirectional transducer mated to a 12″ down-firing woofer in a sealed enclosure accomplishes just that. The Borderland offers a sense of live music that few other speakers convey. With a single driver reproducing the frequencies from 190Hz to 24kHz, the speaker represents a near acoustic point source, creating a holographic stage that is both palpable and believable. And that 12″ sealed driver truly brings the goods while never losing its grip or unraveling. The buyer needs to decide if the unorthodox appearance is suited to their taste. DO, 316

Read the full review: German Physiks Borderland MK IV Loudspeaker
Joseph Audio Pearl 20/20 Graphene

Joseph Audio Pearl 20/20 Graphene

$43,999

The Pearl 20/20 Graphene floorstander comprises two modular sections. The lower half contains twin 8″ woofers, and the upper module contains a 7″ graphene-coated midrange and 1″ Sonatex tweeter. When combined, the two sections form the complete speaker. The Pearl 20/20 Graphene further improves upon the sound of Joseph Audio’s excellent smaller Perspective2 Graphene, especially in the bass with additional power and extension. New FEA advancements in the graphene midrange and subsequent crossover adjustments have yielded a transducer with solid imaging, great soundstaging, excellent clarity, and a stress-free yet detailed presentation. AJ, 309

Read the full review: Joseph Audio Pearl 20/20 Graphene Loudspeaker
Raidho TD2.2

Raidho TD2.2

$46,500

To say the TD2.2 adds a reasonable measure of bass weight and extension to the overall sound of its smaller sibling, the fabulously high-performing TD1.2 mini-monitor, would be an understatement. The rear-ported, 2.5-way TD2.2 sounds much grander in scale and impact than its seemingly modest differences would lead one to expect. The TD2.2 delivers fatigue-free high resolution in the top end and midrange, coupled with satisfying fullness in the low end. Add in expansive soundstaging and focused imaging, and you have a very easy-to-like transducer. Raidho uses its own in-house drivers—one TD ribbon tweeter and two 6.5″ mid/woofers layered with five thin coats of tantalum and industrial diamond on an aluminum cone. Music sparkles through the TD2.2. It invites you to listen closely. KM, 331

Read the full review: Raidho TD2.2 Loudspeaker
Estelon XB Mk II

Estelon XB Mk II

$48,000

The curvaceous cabinet is only the beginning of the XB’s delights. The Estelon delivers incredible detail and spatial resolution, giving music an uncanny tangibility. Further, dynamics and timing are so precise—allowing stylistic nuances to come through so clearly—that the listener feels directly connected to each musician. The trade-offs for these manifest benefits are low sensitivity and a tweeter that skirts the edge of aggressiveness. The XB should be paired with brawny amps, installed on their included spikes, and positioned with minimal toe-in to minimize these effects. (New Mk II version not yet reviewed.) AT, 253

Voxativ 9.87

Voxativ 9.87

$49,990

The horn-loaded Voxativ 9.87 has advantages that neither planar nor dynamic speakers offer. First, it is very high in sensitivity, which allows you to drive it to thunderous levels with an SET or lower-powered amp. Second, it is a single-driver speaker, using one Voxativ 8″, wooden-cone, AC-4D widebander to cover almost the entire audible range. Third, it is augmented in the bass by an amplified dipolar subwoofer, the Pi-Bass. As a result, the 9.87 doesn’t thin down and roll off in the low end and lower midrange as other single-driver loudspeakers do. It has the body, power, and extension that are almost always missing in such designs, making it the most complete and realistic-sounding single-driver transducer JV has heard. JV, 289

Read the full review: Voxativ 9.87 Loudspeaker
Magico A5

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