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Audiovector R6 Arreté Loudspeaker

Audiovector R6 Arreté Loudspeaker

Denmark has long since proven itself a hotspot of high-end audio design and production, yielding a veritable plethora (no, not of piñatas) of creative developments in acoustic transducers, otherwise known as loudspeakers. Consider, if you will, Audiovector—a brand brimming with unique technologies, each described via a smorgasbord of acronyms. Indeed, Audiovector uses so many of these abbreviations that, before I begin discussing the sonics of today’s tasty subject, the R6 Arreté floorstander, I suggest you grab yourself a Carlsberg and prepare for an acronym extravaganza of Danish proportions, all of which I feel obligated to explain.

However, before I turn to lexicography, some history. In 1979, Ole Klifoth founded Audiovector in Copenhagen, Denmark, with the intention of providing the global high-end market with a speaker of exquisite build and natural sonic character. Ole’s son, Mads, is now CEO of the family-owned company, which has been going strong for over 40 years. Ole’s original design principles, which highlighted linear dynamics, linear phase, and low compression, have remained the backbone upon which all Audiovector speakers are built, and are highlighted in its R Series lineup.

The R6 Arreté uses the advanced technology created for Audiovector’s R8 and flagship R11 speakers in a “more affordable” package intended for smaller rooms. The R6 (which comes in Signature, Avantgarde, and Arreté models) employs five drivers in its Signature and Avantgarde iterations and six drivers in the Arreté version, which adds a rear-firing 3″ midrange with its own dedicated crossover. The Avantgarde and Arreté utilize an AMT tweeter, while the Signature uses a dome model. All three versions house varieties of Audiovector’s new carbon drive units, built in Denmark with titanium-coil technology, massive ceramic-ferrite magnets housed on rigid, turbulence-suppressing, magnesium-alloy baskets, and driver membranes of cross-woven Aramid-composite carbon fiber. The two front-firing mid/bass drivers are 6.5-inchers; the isobaric bass-reflex woofer system utilizes internal down-firing 6.5″ and 8″ woofers; and the rear-firing 3″ midrange of the Arreté uses a paper cone to perfectly blend with the AMT dipole tweeter. (Mads says that “the dispersion characteristics of our hand-built mid/bass driver are perfect for a transition between the midrange and the AMT treble driver at around 3kHz. Indeed, it was engineered for that purpose.”) Crossover points are 100Hz, 350Hz, and 3kHz. A beautiful and well-designed carbon-fiber terminal plate is used to reduce interaction with the crossover, which is mounted directly behind the plate. Both spades and bananas are welcome. All models include IUC (Individual Upgrade Concept), LCC (Low Compression Concept), SEC (Soundstage Enhancement Concept), and NES (No Energy Storage) technologies. The Arreté also makes use of NCS (Natural Crystal Structure molecular realignment) and Audiovector’s unique FGC (Freedom Grounding Concept).

AUDIOVECTOR_r6

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Tags: AUDIOVECTOR FLOORSTANDING LOUDSPEAKER

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